You may have read Alan Duff's column. He penned it for the New Zealand Herald.

He's frustrated, it seems, with the way the mainstream media covers the Syrian crisis. Duff believes we're being emotionally manipulated, particularly by television news, because we're being shown images of dead or distressed children caught in the midst of the conflict.

In essence Duff says Aleppo is not our problem. Leave it to the Middle East to sort out, he says. It's not our issue.

He points to that emotive image of the Syrian toddler whose body was found washed up on a beach last year and says the media was trying to pull at our heart strings by showing that image in Greece. Although it wasn't in Greece. It was Turkey. But either or, I guess. It's the other side of the world. Not our problem, as he says.

But Duff's flippancy to the killing in Syria is not unusual. I've met quite a few Alan Duffs while reporting on the Syrian crisis.

Some attempt to find reasons or justifications not to help. It's easier that way, isn't it, then just saying no? It's tidier. Emotionally tidier. It means our money stays in our pockets and we don't open ourselves up emotionally to the suffering of others. God forbid. Move on, there's nothing to see here.

I remember a Facebook comment posted last year on a story I'd written about a young Syrian mother. I'd met her on the Lebanese border and her situation was, well, wretched. She had a toddler and a newborn, and no money. It was winter and her tent was freezing. Her milk was drying up, and she was suffering complications from the birth. Possibly an infection. And she was in the darkest of places.